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Use of Private Prisons is Far From Over


The Federal Government will never stop using GEO group

The DOJ may have announced that is planning to discontinue the use of Private Prisons but that is not only going to have very little impact on the private prison industry but it also misleading in another way. DOJ may hold some immigrants in custody but they hold only a fraction of those in custody.

The Department of Homeland Security has a massive private prison system, which is used to house immigrants.

"The nation’s immigration detention centers, which are run by the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency under the DHS, detain nearly 400,000 immigrants a year, compared to the roughly 200,000 that are held at any given time by the BOP. About 18% of the beds that are used in immigration enforcement are owned by for-profit companies, according to a 2015 study from the Center for American Progress, a progressive advocacy group. Another 24% are located in facilities owned by state and local governments that exclusively house immigrants for ICE." - Fusion Article here.

Corrections Corporation of America, CCA, will be doing just fine without DOJ; They have plenty of customers.

CCA will be fine without DOJ

GEO Group in particular seems like it will continue to thrive even without the DOJ's business.

GEO Group will be fine without the DOJ

As of last year, 62 percent of immigration detention beds were operated by corporations. Some are housed in for-profit facilities contracted with ICE, and many more are in state and local prisons that sub-contract with prison companies.


That’s far more than the share of state and federal prisoners held in private prisons. It’s clear that the rise of privatized immigration facilities has been a huge boon to the industry:


Private Prison Growth is Incredibly high

As Think Progress notes, the DOJ's decision to stop using private prisons does not help immigrants. In their words


"The Problem With The DOJ’s Decision To Stop Using Private PrisonsThe private prison industry will still have access to its biggest cash cow: immigrants." - Read Full Article Here